NMSHA Virtual Conference Program Detail

Friday, October 23


Session 1 – 8:00 am – 10:00 am

Lizard-Brain, Wizard-Brain: Strategies to Manage EF and Emotional Dysregulation – Part 1
Sucheta Kamath, MA, CCC-SLP

A healthy prefrontal system acts more like a cool wizard rather than the brain that is highjacked by the limbic system which acts more like a crazy, reactive lizard brain. This wizard brain enables individuals to readjust behaviors, reassess the social context, reappraise the emotional and affective states and redirect responses to produce favorable outcomes for self and for others. In this session, the presenter will discuss self-regulation, social-emotional competence and an effective Mindful Examination of Thinking and Awareness (META) intervention approach designed to enhance Executive Function (EF) including goal-directed planning, strategic thinking and future-forward thinking. The session will present effective and evidence-based strategies to help manage executive dysfunction and emotional dysregulation in children and adults with cognitive-communication disorders in a variety of contexts. Finally, this presentation will help clinicians dive deep into the interplay between one’s own EF skills and of those that we coach, teach or manage.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the nature and scope of Hot and Cool Executive Function, social-emotional regulation and role of context in producing effective self-directed goals.
  • Describe the role of emotions in self-regulation as it relates to the daily adaptive processes in children and adults in emotionally charged situations.
  • Identify practical interventions that promotes the development of key components of EF in multiple contexts.
  • Integrate tools and methods that promote the transfer and generalization of social-emotional, cognitive, and EF skills beyond the clinical setting into everyday situations.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Speaker Disclosure:
Financial Relationship: Presenter is the founder/owner of the private practice Cerebral Matters where she sees clients. She is the Founder/Creator of ExQ software curriculum from which she benefits from its sales. She is receiving an honorarium from NMSHA for her presentation.
Non-Financial Relationship: Presenter is current past president of GSHA and treasurer of GSHFoundation.

Session 2 – 8:00 am – 9:30 am

(Central) Auditory Processing Disorders: Identification Through Intervention
Beth O’Brien, MA, East Central BOCES, Limon, Colorado

Auditory processing disorders (APD or CAPD) are common buzz words for today’s audiologists and speech-language pathologists. Yet, there is no ‘gold standard’ for assessment or intervention. There is conflicting information in public and professional media and, even some publications/presentation which question the existence of the disorder(s) entirely. Regardless of the name, there are auditory skills that are necessary for success in school, social interactions and daily life. This session will focus on specific auditory skills, their functions in communication and learning, and suggestions for identifying, assessing and providing intervention/supports for people with specific skill deficits in using auditory information accurately and efficiently in daily life.  This presentation will include information on the following products:  APD Assessments including SCAN-C, Acoustic Pioneer Battery of Auditory Processing Tests, Functional Listening Evaluations, etc. (Commonly advertised assessment of CAPD)

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify and describe the function of  a minimum of three auditory ‘processing’ skills.
  • List five ways an SLP can/should be involved in identifying and treating auditory processing skills.
  • List a minimum of two auditory factors frequently seen in Autism Spectrum Disorder.
  • List two common considerations needed in evaluating auditory memory skills in education.

Level of Learning:  Intermediate

Speaker Disclosure:
Financial Relationship:  Presenter is receiving an honorarium from NMSHA for her presentation.
Non-Financial Relationship:  Presenter has no non-financial relationships to disclose.

Session 3 – 9:45 am – 11:15 am

Well-Hearing is Well-Being: Hearing Loss and Cognitive Decline
Nikolas Klakow, AuD, Sonova-Phonak

This session will investigate the role that hearing has on physical, cognitive and social-emotional well-being.  There is sufficient evidence to treat hearing loss holistically as part of the greater well-being of the person with hearing loss.  Physical effects associated with hearing loss have been documented in greater propensity for falls (Agmon, Lavie, & Doumas, 2016)  and poorer physical functioning (Chen et al., 2015).  Research has shown that there are known associations between hearing loss and cognitive abilities (Livingston, G., et al. (2017) Dementia prevention, intervention, and care. The Lancet). Cognitive decline has been seen to be accelerated in people with hearing loss. Several hypotheses exist regarding the underlying mechanisms driving the described associations and science is currently trying to find the most likely explanation. The session will give an overview of the current state of knowledge. Lastly,  the course will present how social engagement has become an area of increased interest in health care, as relationships, social support, social influence and social integration may mediate health outcomes (Berkman et al., 2000; Uchino, 2006), potentially also mediating the association between hearing loss and cognitive change (Amieva et al., 2015).

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the associations between cognitive decline and hearing loss
  • Assess the current evidence related to hearing and cognitive decline
  • Assess the current evidence of amplification and cognitive decline

Level of Learning:  Introductory

Speaker Disclosure:
Financial Relationship:  Presenter is a salaried employee of Sonova
Non-Financial Relationship:  Presenter has no non-financial relationships to disclose.

Session 4 – 10:15 am – 12:15 pm

Lizard-Brain, Wizard-Brain: Strategies to Manage EF and Emotional Dysregulation – Part 2
Sucheta Kamath, MA, CCC-SLP

A healthy prefrontal system acts more like a cool wizard rather than the brain that is highjacked by the limbic system which acts more like a crazy, reactive lizard brain. This wizard brain enables individuals to readjust behaviors, reassess the social context, reappraise the emotional and affective states and redirect responses to produce favorable outcomes for self and for others. In this session, the presenter will discuss self-regulation, social-emotional competence and an effective Mindful Examination of Thinking and Awareness (META) intervention approach designed to enhance Executive Function (EF) including goal-directed planning, strategic thinking and future-forward thinking. The session will present effective and evidence-based strategies to help manage executive dysfunction and emotional dysregulation in children and adults with cognitive-communication disorders in a variety of contexts. Finally, this presentation will help clinicians dive deep into the interplay between one’s own EF skills and of those that we coach, teach or manage.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the nature and scope of Hot and Cool Executive Function, social-emotional regulation and role of context in producing effective self-directed goals.
  • Describe the role of emotions in self-regulation as it relates to the daily adaptive processes in children and adults in emotionally charged situations.
  • Identify practical interventions that promotes the development of key components of EF in multiple contexts.
  • Integrate tools and methods that promote the transfer and generalization of social-emotional, cognitive, and EF skills beyond the clinical setting into everyday situations.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Speaker Disclosure:
Financial Relationship: Presenter is the founder/owner of the private practice Cerebral Matters where she sees clients. She is the Founder/Creator of ExQ software curriculum from which she benefits from its sales. She is receiving an honorarium from NMSHA for her presentation.
Non-Financial Relationship: Presenter is current past president of GSHA and treasurer of GSHFoundation.

Session 5 – 1:00 pm – 4:15 pm

Infant and Pediatric Feeding Tubes: Who, What, When, Why and How Long?
Andrea Martinez-Fisher, CCC-SLP, University of New Mexico; Anne Richtmyer, CCC-SLP, Presbyterian Hospital; Celestina Martinez, CCC-SLP, Presbyterian Hospital; Hayley Escandon, MS, RD, CSP, LD, Presbyterian Hospital

Feeding tubes are placed in infants and pediatric patients for a variety of reasons. This presentation will explore alternative feeding options. We will discuss who typically is a candidate, when and how they are identified, and how therapists can help patient and family transition to oral nutrition. Speakers will discuss these complex patients from NICU to early childhood.  Case studies will illustrate the complex co-morbidities these patients often face.  The caregiver perspective will be considered when setting therapy goals and in treatment.  Scope of practice and the larger management team will be reviewed.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify alternative nutrition sources and discuss considerations of each.
  • Identify the feeding management team and each member’s role on the team.
  • Discuss 3 possible reasons children may need a long term alternative nutrition source.
  • List 3 considerations in choosing feeding goals with children with feeding tubes.

Level of Learning:  Introductory

Speaker Disclosures:

Andrea Martinez-Fisher
Financial Relationship:  Presenter has no financial relationships to disclose.
Non-Financial Relationship:  Presenter has no non-financial relationships to disclose.

Anne Richtmyer
Financial Relationship:  Presenter has no financial relationships to disclose.
Non-Financial Relationship:  Presenter has no non-financial relationships to disclose.

Celestina Martinez:
Financial Relationship:  Presenter has no financial relationships to disclose.
Non-Financial Relationship:  Presenter has no non-financial relationships to disclose.

Hayley Escandon
Financial Relationship:  Presenter has no financial relationships to disclose.
Non-Financial Relationship:  Presenter has no non-financial relationships to disclose.

Session 6 – 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Oticon Connectivity Options in a Changing World
Amy Bohms, BA, Oticon

Technology has become an integral part of our everyday lives. These innovations have changed the way we connect with the world around us. In this seminar, we will review how Oticon’s connectivity options can add additional opportunities to improve the signal to noise ratio and provide technology-based conveniences.  This presentation will include information on the following product: Oticon Connectivity and Accessories

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify listening challenges faced by the hearing-impaired patient.
  • Describe the solutions available to address a variety of listening challenges.
  • Apply their knowledge of options to recommending an appropriate solution.

Level of Learning:  Intermediate

Speaker Disclosure:
Financial Relationship:  Presenter is a salaried employee of Oticon.
Non-Financial Relationship:  Presenter’s relatives Scott and Theo Bohms wear Oticon Opn S 1 devices.

Session 7 – 2:45 pm – 4:15 pm

Improving Diagnosis and Management of Children With Minimal Hearing Loss
Elizabeth Walker, PhD, University of Iowa

With the advent of early hearing detection and intervention programs, developmental outcomes in children with hearing loss have improved in recent years. However, the benefits of these advances for children with mild bilateral hearing loss (MBHL) have not been fully realized, due in part to clinical ambiguity about the benefits of intervention for this subgroup of children with hearing loss. Intervention may be delayed for children with MBHL, even when hearing loss is identified during infancy. Even after hearing loss has been confirmed, some children with MBHL do not receive intervention due to uncertainty among audiologists, speech-language pathologists and parents about the potential benefits of early intervention and amplification. Furthermore, children with MBHL  who are fitted with amplification often do not use their devices consistently, leading to persistent developmental delays. Another barrier to serving children with MBHL is the lack of sensitive clinical tools that reflect their unique challenges. The goals of the current talk are to describe audibility-based hearing-aid candidacy criteria for children with MBHL, describe hearing assistive technologies for children and the role of classroom acoustics for children with MBHL and describe management for children with MBHL. The knowledge and clinical tools described in this presentation will enhance our ability to make evidence-based decisions about intervention for children with MBHL and improve developmental outcomes for these children.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify audibility-based criteria for fitting amplification for children with mild hearing loss
  • Describe audiologic interventions that can improve auditory access for children with mild hearing loss
  • List protective factors that support outcomes in children with mild hearing loss

Level of Learning:  Intermediate

Speaker Disclosure:
Financial Relationship:  Presenter has received NIH grant funding (Grant: NIH NIDCD R01DC009560) and an honorarium from NMSHA for her presentation.
Non-Financial Relationship:  Presenter has no non-financial relationships to disclose.

Saturday, October 24


Session 8 – 8:00 am – 10:00 am

Professional Ethics for the Practicing Clinician – Part 1
Melanie W. Hudson, MA, EBS Healthcare

Practicing speech-language pathologists and audiologists can benefit from increased awareness of issues pertaining to ethical practice. An overview of sections of the revised (2016) ASHA Code of Ethics will be followed by a discussion of recurring themes in ethical issues confronting clinicians in a variety of settings. Participants will also discuss how to solve ethical dilemmas.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe a professional code of ethics
  • Discuss recurring themes in ethical issues pertaining to clinical practice
  • Identify supportive resources when facing ethical dilemmas

Level of Learning:  Intermediate

Speaker Disclosure:
Financial Relationship:  Presenter is receiving an honorarium from NMSHA for her presentation.
Non-Financial Relationship:  Presenter has no non-financial relationships to disclose.

Session 9 – 10:15 am – 11:15 am

Professional Ethics for the Practicing Clinician – Part 2
Melanie W. Hudson, MA, EBS Healthcare

Practicing speech-language pathologists and audiologists can benefit from increased awareness of issues pertaining to ethical practice. An overview of sections of the revised (2016) ASHA Code of Ethics will be followed by a discussion of recurring themes in ethical issues confronting clinicians in a variety of settings. Participants will also discuss how to solve ethical dilemmas.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe a professional code of ethics
  • Discuss recurring themes in ethical issues pertaining to clinical practice
  • Identify supportive resources when facing ethical dilemmas

Level of Learning:  Intermediate

Speaker Disclosure:
Financial Relationship:  Presenter is receiving an honorarium from NMSHA for her presentation.
Non-Financial Relationship:  Presenter has no non-financial relationships to disclose.

Session 10 – 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Tools and Strategies in Clinical Supervision – Part 1
Melanie W. Hudson, MA, EBS Healthcare

Clinical educators recognize the importance of critical thinking skills that lead to independent practice.  The stages of skill acquisition that provide the foundation for the development of clinical skills and knowledge will be discussed. The research, evidence and key elements that support reflective practice and self-assessment will be highlighted throughout the presentation. Participants will use ASHA’s 2016 self-assessment tool to rate their own competencies as supervisors and develop individualized goals for personal growth in supervision.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify stages of skill acquisition in the development of clinical skills and knowledge.
  • Discuss evidence-supported strategies promoting independence through self-assessment and critical reflection.
  • Complete a self-assessment tool for development of competencies in supervision.

Level of Learning:  Intermediate

Speaker Disclosure:
Financial Relationship:  Presenter is receiving an honorarium from NMSHA for her presentation.
Non-Financial Relationship:  Presenter has no non-financial relationships to disclose.

Session 11 – 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm

Tools and Strategies in Clinical Supervision – Part 2
Melanie W. Hudson, MA, EBS Healthcare

Clinical educators recognize the importance of critical thinking skills that lead to independent practice.  The stages of skill acquisition that provide the foundation for the development of clinical skills and knowledge will be discussed. The research, evidence and key elements that support reflective practice and self-assessment will be highlighted throughout the presentation. Participants will use ASHA’s 2016 self-assessment tool to rate their own competencies as supervisors and develop individualized goals for personal growth in supervision.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify stages of skill acquisition in the development of clinical skills and knowledge.
  • Discuss evidence-supported strategies promoting independence through self-assessment and critical reflection.
  • Complete a self-assessment tool for development of competencies in supervision.

Level of Learning:  Intermediate

Speaker Disclosure:
Financial Relationship:  Presenter is receiving an honorarium from NMSHA for her presentation.
Non-Financial Relationship:  Presenter has no non-financial relationships to disclose.

Recordings


Oh My TBI, Are You Prepared?
Adrienne Bratcher, SLPD, Eastern New Mexico University
6 hours

While the definition of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common to speech-language pathologists (SLPs), understanding how to treat a patient who has suffered from a TBI is not always common knowledge. Furthermore, treating a child or school-age student who has suffered from a TBI tends to be even far less common. In fact, children/youth who suffer from a TBI may go undetected and without a better understanding of how TBIs affect the younger population, often the youth will struggle in school with no known cause or help. The presentation will be divided into two parts: 1) The basics surrounding TBI: a brief review of types of TBIs, review of possible cognitive changes as well as communication difficulties, SLPs roles and responsibilities with the TBI population. 2) Differentiation for working with children and youth: discussion of the differences in assessment for children/youth vs. adults, strategies for identifying students who might need an assessment due to a possible TBI, how SLPs can increase awareness regarding TBIs, and current research data and resources for TBIs.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Provide a comparison of how a TBI impacts youth vs adults
  • State three possible cognitive changes due to a TBI
  • Discuss ways SLPs can advocate for individuals suffering from a TBI
  • List resources available for TBI

Level of Learning:  Advanced

Speaker Disclosure:
Financial Relationship:  Presenter is currently an associate professor at Eastern New Mexico University. In addition, she is a certified brain injury specialist trainer and does conduct trainings for the Brain Injury Association under that role.
Non-Financial Relationship:  Presenter serves on the NMSHA board as the VP for Governmental Affairs-Medical, on the ASHA Advisory Council as the speech-language pathologist for New Mexico, and is appointed by the governor to the New Mexico Brain Injury Advisory Council.

An Evidenced-Based Philosophy for Collaboratively Helping People Who Stutter
Richard Arenas, PhD, University of New Mexico
3 hours

Recent advances in basic and applied research in stuttering will frame the rationale for collaborative approaches focused on goals that go well beyond fluency alone.  A three-pillared approach is presented that helps SLPs discover client-centered goals focused on effective communication, acceptance and quality of life.  Attendees will gain a better understanding of the experience of stuttering for both people who stutter and parents, and how the individual’s experiences and challenges should dictate the SLPs role in the change process.  To best prepare clinicians to help people who stutter, a wide array of evidence based approaches are discussed.  In addition, attendees will learn about local, national and internet-based resources and support groups.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify a basic description of the neural correlates of stuttering.
  • Discuss the recovery rates of preschool stuttering.
  • Discuss the common experiences of people who stutter.
  • Identify a wide array of treatment approaches to match their client’s goals.

Level of Learning:  Intermediate

Speaker Disclosure:
Financial Relationship:  Presenter is receiving an honorarium from NMSHA for his presentation.
Non-Financial Relationship:  Presenter has no non-financial relationships to disclose.

Cultural Considerations in Narrative Intervention
Teresa Roberts, EdD, Portland State University
Jennifer Larsen, PhD, BOLD Pediatric Therapy and Pacific University
6 hours

Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) who have an understanding of cultural differences are positioned to support children with language disorders in using narrative language to create and express their lived experiences. Narrow views of narrative macrostructures are inherently limiting in working with children and families from underrepresented communities. As SLPs encounter children and families from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, there is increasing need to understand cultural influences on use and understanding of narrative language. Given that narrative skill development is foundational in academic success, children from underrepresented communities may experience barriers in demonstrating narrative competency when expected to perform within a North American/European macrostructural style. We’ll discuss narrative intervention with diverse populations, including narrative macrostructures and lesson planning using Latin American, Asian, Native American and African American narratives. Example lesson plans will be provided.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the need for culturally responsive practices in narrative intervention.
  • Identify key features of different culturally based narrative macrostructures
  • Identify key factors in lesson planning when working on narratives with children and adolescents from diverse backgrounds
  • Recognize the role of the SLP in reducing barriers to narrative language to support literacy development

Level of Learning:  Introductory

Speaker Disclosure:

TeresaRoberts
Financial Relationship:  Presenter is receiving an honorarium from NMSHA for her presentation.
Non-Financial Relationship:  Presenter has no non-financial relationships to disclose.

JenniferLarsen
Financial Relationship:  Presenter is receiving an honorarium from NMSHA for her presentation.
Non-Financial Relationship:  Presenter has no non-financial relationships to disclose.

Advocacy, Leadership and Volunteerism: Strategies for Member Success
Kia Johnson, CCC-SLP, University of Houston, ASHA
2 hours

Session will focus on skill development in advocacy, leadership and volunteerism related to the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology. A member of the ASHA Board of Directors will discuss strategies for successful advocacy, opportunities to lead, and ways to get involved. Issues described in ASHA’s Public Policy Agenda (PPA) will be highlighted as well as strategies for how speech-language pathologists and audiologists can get involved in advocacy efforts to ensure favorable outcomes for members and consumers in their state related to:  Advocating for maintaining current IDEA funding levels and the use of terminology that is consistent in both IDEA and ESEA regulatory language; Promoting comprehensive coverage of audiology services and ensuring that private and public insurance includes coverage of habilitation services; Increasing recruitment and retention of the full continuum of speech-language pathology and audiology personnel available to meet the needs of individuals with communication disorders.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe at least three traits common to great leaders
  • Identify up to three skills acquired through ASHA’s Leadership Development Program (LDP)
  • Identify three reasons why members choose not to volunteer
  • Describe up to three internal or external rewards for being an ASHA volunteer
  • Identify three skills acquired through volunteer leadership that transfer to other settings including work
  • Describe three reasons why it is important to advocate
  • Identify three steps in developing a comprehensive advocacy action plan
  • Identify up to three factors to be considered when making a legislative visit
  • Identify three legislative and/or regulatory advocacy  issues  important to members
  • Describe the method that members can use to take action on federal and state issues using the ASHA website.

Level of Learning:  Introductory

Speaker Disclosure:
Financial Relationship:  Presenter received Convention registration provided by NMSHA and is a salaried employee at the University of Houston.
Non-Financial Relationship:  Presenter is a member of the ASHA Board of Directors, National Advisor to National NSSLHA, and Chair of the NBASLH Board of Directors