New Mexico Speech-Language-Hearing Association 59th Annual Convention Program Detail

Friday, October 15

*ALL TIMES NOTED ARE MOUNTAIN TIME ZONE*

SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY TRACK


F1 – 8:30 am – 12:00 am MT (3 hour session with a half hour break from 10:00 am – 10:30 am)

Motivation Matters: Positive Supports and AAC Strategies for Children With Autism
Cindy Gevater, PhD

One of the core characteristics of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is the presence of restricted interests or repetitive behaviors. Rather than viewing these interests or behaviors as deficits, clinicians can use them to determine what motivates a child. Motivation plays a key role in intervention for young children with ASD. For instance, understanding motivators can help clinicians to determine the communicative function of challenging behaviors and use positive support strategies to prevent or reduce behaviors. For children with ASD who require augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), understanding motivators is also important when introducing new systems and expanding a learner’s vocabulary to include communicative functions beyond simple item requests. This session will focus on methods for determining learner preferences/motivators, along with ways to use knowledge of motivation to (a) prevent or reduce challenging behaviors and (b) implement AAC intervention.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify methods and resources for determining learner preferences/motivators of children with autism.
  • Describe methods and resources for using motivation to prevent or reduce challenging behaviors.
  • Describe strategies for using motivation during AAC intervention.

Level of Learning: Intermediate


Poster Sessions – 10:00 am – 10:30 am MT (Will repeat 2:30 pm – 3:00 pm MT)

F2 – Beyond Core Vocabulary Word Frequency: What’s in a Toddler’s Utterance?
Priscilla Magallanes; Cathy Binger, PhD, CCC-SLP

Core vocabulary approaches are commonly used to select vocabulary for preliterate children who use aided augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). When used exclusively, this approach does not fully incorporate some of the basic principles of child language development. In an effort to begin to broaden the focus of core vocabulary research, the current investigation examines the use of core and fringe vocabulary at an utterance level, rather than the usual approach of calculating word frequency. Language samples of typically developing children who are two and a half years old were analyzed to determine the percentage of utterances that contained only core vocabulary, only fringe vocabulary or a combination of both. Results indicated that approximately half of the children’s utterances contained only core vocabulary, while the other half contained either a combination of core + fringe, or only fringe vocabulary. From a clinical perspective, the findings are a strong reminder that aided AAC vocabulary must include a balance of both core and fringe vocabulary.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define core vocabulary and fringe vocabulary.
  • State the percentage of toddlers’ utterances that contain core vocabulary, fringe vocabulary or both.
  • List one practical clinical implication for the findings.

Level of Learning:  Intermediate

F7 – Increasing Teletherapy Engagement with a Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Katherine Kirtley

Teletherapy extends the reach of speech-language pathology (SLP) services, especially during COVID-19. An examination is needed to determine which factors impact the successful delivery of teletherapy interventions. Additionally, most children in New Mexico are of Native American or Hispanic decent, leaving questions about how teletherapy interacts with children’s cultural and linguistic diversity.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify at least two ways SLP teletherapy practice has extended the reach of services.
  • Describe potential areas of cultural and linguistic differences that may impact SLP sessions delivered via teletherapy.
  • Discuss the impact of various intervention variables on the success of an SLP session delivered via teletherapy.

Level of Learning:  Intermediate


F3 – 8:30 am – 10:00 am MT

Completing an Oral Mechanical Evaluation
Kindra Davis, MS, CCC-SLP, COM

A review for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) on completing a thorough oral mechanical evaluation to help identify and/or rule out structural/functional findings that can impact speech, feeding and swallowing. Many SLPs are not comfortable completing a thorough oral mechanical evaluation, however, there are many pieces that will negatively impact success in therapy if structural issues are not identified. Examples can include tonsils impacting feeding and swallowing (dysphagia/feeding difficulties); decreased articulator coordination, strength or ROM impacting speech (i.e., dysarthria/articulation); decreased awareness; hypersensitivity/overactive or misplaced gag reflex (dysphagia/feeding difficulties).

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Complete a thorough oral mechanical evaluation and report results.
  • Identify three structures that can impact speech.
  • Identify three structures that can impact feeding/swallowing.

Level of Learning:  Introductory


F4 – 10:30 am – 12:00 pm MT

Completing an Oral Mechanical and Chairside Swallow Evaluation
Kindra Davis, MS, CCC-SLP, COM

This presentation is designed to be a review of completing a thorough oral mechanical and chairside swallow evaluation. It will help speech-language pathologists (SLPs) feel more comfortable completing and reporting findings on these evaluations as well as recognize how these findings can impact therapy success with feeding, swallowing, and speech. For therapists working with the pediatric population this presentation addresses more from perspective of patients that have difficulty imitating oral motor movements during an oral mechanical evaluation.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify three structures that can impact speech/feeding.
  • Identify two phases of the swallow that can be evaluated chairside.
  • Identify oral preparatory differences in a liquid versus a solid.

Level of Learning: Intermediate


F5 – 1:00 pm – 4:30 pm MT (3 hour session with a half hour break from 2:30 pm – 3:00 pm)

Panel: Assessment and Intervention for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Lead Presenter: Joan Esse Wilson, PhD, CCC-SLP; Panelists: Heike Lehnert-LeHouillier, PhD, CCC-SLP; Kali Hall, MA, LCSW; Lisa Peterson, PhD; Victoria Alamaguer, MA, CCC-SLP

This interdisciplinary panel of speech-language pathologists and psychologists will discuss current perspectives in assessment and intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Specific topics will address social communication, behavior and the impact of the COVID-19 health emergency on mental health and access to services. ASD diagnostics will be discussed, with specific approaches for completing assessment and intervention in culturally and linguistically diverse communities. This is especially relevant in New Mexico, where we are one of the most culturally and linguistically diverse states in the country. ASD is now the fastest-growing neurodevelopmental disorder in the United States (Center for Disease Control, 2016), with one recent study showing a prevalence rate as high as one in 40 children (Zablotsky et al., 2019). Social deficits and restricted, repetitive behaviors are key diagnostic features for ASD (American Psychiatric Association, 2013) and often represent lifelong barriers to developing and maintaining meaningful relationships (Reichow & Volkmar, 2010), obtaining rewarding employment and living independently (Hedley et al., 2016). These challenges impact nearly every aspect of an individual’s life with ASD, also causing substantial stress and hardship for families and loved ones (Lecavalier, Leone, & Wiltz, 2006), which highlights the need for appropriate early diagnosis and intervention.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss current perspectives on interventions for children with ASD to improve social and behavioral outcomes.
  • Describe the impact of the COVID-19 health emergency on mental health and access to services for children with ASD.
  • Outline approaches for completing assessment and intervention for children with ASD from culturally and linguistically diverse communities.

Level of Learning:  Intermediate


F6 – 1:00 pm – 4:30 pm MT (3 hour session with a half hour break from 2:30 pm – 3:00 pm)
AAC Intervention with Preschoolers: Techniques to Build Grammar Skills
Seana Evelyn, MA, CCC-SLP;
Cathy Binger, PhD, CCC-SLP

Hadley’s (2014) sentence focus framework advised that grammar is a necessary skill for building sentences. Children who use aided augmentative and alternative communication(AAC) must progress past early pragmatic and semantic development and build grammar abilities to become proficient communicators (Binger et al., 2020). However, expressive grammar is a challenge for many people who use AAC (Binger et al., 2011). A variety of AAC-related issues are likely to contribute to these problems (Binger et al., 2020). Still, preliminary results from a current research project demonstrate that preschoolers with various disabilities can learn how to increase their length of utterance using AAC by targeting grammar. This research is part of the Word by Word: Supporting Sentence Development for Children who use AAC project. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the rationale behind addressing grammar in AAC intervention; describe and demonstrate the use of grammar intervention to support young children who use AAC as they transition from early symbol productions to child-like sentences; and provide strategies to incorporate grammar into effective AAC intervention.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the evidence-based rationale for grammar intervention in AAC.
  • Identify three strategies to increasing the length of utterance in AAC.
  • Identify three appropriate grammar targets for preschoolers using AAC.

Level of Learning:  Intermediate

AUDIOLOGY TRACK


F8 – 8:00 am – 12:15 pm MT (4 hour session with a 15-minute break from 10:00 am – 10:15 am)

Auditory Processing Disorders: Where Do I Start?, Part 1
Beth O’Brien, MA, CCC-A; Rachel Franck, MA, CCC-SLP

An overview of the components of auditory processing disorders including current views of the definition of an ‘auditory processing disorder,’ the path from diagnosis to intervention, questions to ask in the process, implementing the ‘tools’ you already have in your toolbox, collaboration tips for working as an audiologist/speech-language pathologist team and an opportunity to ask your questions. This session will focus on practical information for clinicians. This is not a research review and will only briefly cover the controversy regarding the existence/non-existence of auditory processing disorders.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify and describe/define a minimum of four specific skill areas of auditory processing.
  • Identify a minimum of five ‘red flags’ that are reasons to refer to an audiologist for additional assessment.
  • Identify three ‘tools’ that a speech-pathologist can use in a therapeutic intervention plan for an individual diagnosed with an auditory processing disorder.

Level of Learning:  Intermediate


F9 – 12:45 pm – 2:15 pm MT

Auditory Processing Disorders: Where Do I Start?, Part 2
Beth O’Brien, MA, CCC-A; Rachel Franck, MA, CCC-SLP

An overview of the components of auditory processing disorders including current views of the definition of an ‘auditory processing disorder,’ the path from diagnosis to intervention, questions to ask in the process, implementing the ‘tools’ you already have in your toolbox, collaboration tips for working as an audiologist/speech-language pathologist team and an opportunity to ask your questions. This session will focus on practical information for clinicians. This is not a research review and will only briefly cover the controversy regarding the existence/non-existence of auditory processing disorders.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify and describe/define a minimum of four specific skill areas of auditory processing.
  • Identify a minimum of five ‘red flags’ that are reasons to refer to an audiologist for additional assessment.
  • Identify three ‘tools’ that a speech-pathologist can use in a therapeutic intervention plan for an individual diagnosed with an auditory processing disorder.

Level of Learning:  Intermediate


F10 – 2:30 pm – 4:30 pm MT

Audiological Management of COVID-19 Survivors – What We Know So Far
Robert M. DiSogra, AuD, FAAA

The impact of the COVID-19 virus has been having an impact within the audiology profession since 2020. It is only since the summer of 2020, that research began to emerge about the virus, its spread, preventative measures, repurposing of approved FDA pharmaceuticals, as well as a record setting time to develop preventative vaccines. As of September 1, 2021, more than 165,000 COVID-19-related manuscripts have been published according to the National Library of Medicine. Despite all this research, there is still no generally recognized diagnosis terminology for COVID-19 and its survivors. There were at least 11 terms being proposed or referenced as of May 1, 2021. What has emerged in early 2021 is that MRI data shows a significant shrinkage in several brain structures involved in auditory processing when compared to pre-pandemic MRIs on the same patients. The term “brain fog” has emerged along with “mild cognitive impairment” to describe this post-diagnosis issue. The program will attempt to raise awareness that ‘brain fog” might actually be an auditory processing disorder. Also being addressed will be hearing loss, tinnitus, vestibular problems, repurposed drugs, new vaccines side effects, pediatric concerns (late diagnosed), special populations (i.e., Down syndrome, blindness, diabetes), cerumen management, the use of dietary supplements as an intention strategy and insurance billing issues. Each area will be addressed with recommendations to manage COVID-19 survivors during this two-hour program.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify how the COVID-19 virus that causes hearing loss/tinnitus and/or balance problems and the degree and types of hearing loss that could occur.
  • Decide and interpret which audiometric tests (objective and subjective) are appropriate for COVID-19 survivors as well as what test results to expect.
  • Compare the similarities between ‘brain fog” and an auditory processing disorder and decide the best course of management.

Level of Learning:  Intermediate

Saturday, October 16


S1 – 8:00 am – 10:00 am MT (This presentation will go towards your supervision requirement)

More Than “Just” Supervising
Lori A. Nelson, MS, CCC-SLP; Genevieve Munoz, MA, CCC-SLP; Laura Bucknell, MS, CCC-SLP

Supervision is a key component of all graduate programs, including the ones found here in New Mexico. Supervisors in the community are key to the success of graduates from New Mexico State University, Eastern New Mexico University, and University of New Mexico to move from graduate student to practicing speech-language pathologists. This session will explore topics related to supervision such as: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association requirements and standards as well as offer some general resources for supervisors. It will include an overview of the three universities in New Mexico and their program requirements for supervisors. Finally, it will cover some hot topics including generational differences, professionalism and Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). This session is intended to support not only current supervisors but also future ones.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify supervision requirements and find access to resources for those requirements.
  • List three ways to support the marginal student.
  • Recall strategies to encourage strong communication across various generational assignments.

Time-Ordered Agenda:
10 minutes – Introductions
30 minutes – ASHA Supervision: Requirements, Standards, General Resources
40 minutes – New Mexico SLP Programs: ENMU, NMSU, UNM, Resources
40 minutes – Hot Topics: Generations, Professionalism, FERPA, FAQs

Level of Learning:  Intermediate


S2 – 9:00 am – 10:00 am MT (This presentation will go towards your supervision requirement) Pre-Recorded

Support Personnel: Training, Trends and Regulation
Eileen Crowe, MA; Lisa Wolf, BA

This presentation will examine the history of assistants and American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) and the ASHA assistant certification program. Additionally, it will explore trends in the states relating to the laws and regulations governing support personnel, their evolving role, and on-line resources available on the roles and supervision of both audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel. Through scenarios, attendees will explore the impact of support personnel in various practice settings.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Examine the ASHA audiology and speech-language pathology assistant certification programs.
  • Discuss support personnel initiatives in states for audiology and speech-language pathology assistants.
  • Examine support personnel trends nationwide for audiology and speech-language pathology assistants and ASHA resources available on support personnel.

Time-Ordered Agenda:
2 minutes – Introduction
3 minutes – ASHA State Liaisons
5 minutes – ASHA’s History with Support Personnel
5 minutes – ASHA Assistant Certification Program
10 minutes – ASHA Scope of Practice, Education, and Supervision of SLPAs and Audiology Assistants
5 minutes – ASHA Practice Portal and Use of Support Personnel
5 minutes – Reimbursement
5 minutes – Tele-supervision and COVID-19
5 minutes – ASHA Networks and Nationwide Trends
5 minutes – ASHA Web Resources and State Examples
10 minutes – Scenarios

Level of Learning:  Intermediate


S3 – 10:15 am – 11:45 am MT (This presentation will go towards your ethics requirement) – Pre-Recorded

SuperHeros Reflect the Big E
Adrienne McElroy-Bratcher, SLPD, CCC-SLP, CBIST

Ethics presented from a Superhero perspective. That’s right, ethics doesn’t have to be boring, and simply reading rules and regulations. Yes, rules and regulations are important and everyone needs to have a refresher of the do’s and don’ts, but ethical violations often occur on a small scale in everyday practice. Taking a look at the application of ethics in everyday practice is valuable and applicable to day-to-day practice. The presentation will discuss ethical dilemmas, including client abandonment, conflicts of interest, confidentiality, employer demands and supervision concerns along with a discussion of how to avoid these dilemmas.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify situations that raise ethical concerns.
  • Provide a summary of ASHA’s code of ethics.
  • Describe at least one way to avoid ethical dilemmas.

Level of Learning:  Intermediate

Time Ordered Agenda:
5 Minutes – Introduction/Disclosures
15 Minutes – Review ASHA code of Ethics and New Mexico Speech-Language Pathology, Audiology and Hearing Aid Dispensing Practices Code of E
25 Minutes – Review of Five Ethical Principles and discuss examples
30 Minutes – Discuss case scenarios if possible ethical implications and suggestions of avoiding this situations
15 Minutes – Q and A


S4 – 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm MT

How Do You Present and Get a Legislative Bill/Law Passed? Legislative Process and Update!
Sue Griffith; Richard Romero

The process for acquiring a sponsor for a bill and then getting the bill passed is long and tedious. Even though the presenters have been doing this for a long time, there are times they are surprised and excited while other times they may be disappointed. What you may think should only take one legislative session, may in fact, take 10 legislative sessions to get a bill passed. It begins with locating a sponsor for a bill before the legislative session begins. Once the legislative session begins, the work of attending each legislative committee begins as the bill progresses through the various committees. At times, the presenters are called upon to attend a committee meeting in the early morning hours or extremely late hours often after 10:00 pm. Testimonies and support occur throughout the entire process. Each legislative house must pass the bill before it may be signed by the Governor. Even if the bill passes both houses of the state legislature, the Governor could veto it or let it just die on his/her desk.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the process to get a bill sponsor.
  • Describe how a bill passes from one committee to another before it is voted on and passed.
  • Explain what happens if the bill is signed or not signed by the Governor.

Level of Learning:  Introductory

S5 – 2:45 pm – 4:15 pm MT

PANEL: Speech-Language Pathologist – Assistant Task Force From Across NM
Lauryn Waits, MS, CCC-SLP; Karen Shirley, MS, CCC-SLP; Phyllis Palmer, PhD, CCC-SLP

The SLP-Assistant Task Force was developed by the New Mexico Speech-Language and Hearing Association (NMSHA) as a committee to include NMSHA members and non-members from across New Mexico. It has been composed of approximately 16 consistent members from across the state. Members have contributed much time as they have been meeting one to two times a month since December 2019. They have reviewed and discussed the SLP-Assistants ASHA’s scope of practice in depth. Discussions centered around, “How do we make the lives of current SLPs in the state easier rather than more overwhelming,” when they looked at the issue of supervising and working with an SLP assistant. The SLP-Assistant Task Force voted and agreed that ASHA’s SLP-Assistant Certification should be the minimal requirement for licensure in New Mexico. It was also decided that the supervising speech-language pathologist should provide on-going services to all students/clients/ patients a certain percentage of time rather than just letting SLP-Assistant work on his/her own with students/clients/ patients 100 percent of the time. The percentage of time the supervising speech-language pathologist will be required to work with all students/clients/patients is still in discussion.

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List two items the SLP-Assistant Task Force has discussed.
  • Explain the roles of the supervising speech-language pathologist and the SLP assistant.
  • Provide input for further discussion.

Level of Learning:  Intermediate